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IMMagine Australia Blog

Migrating is more than just filling in forms and submitting paperwork, its a complex process that will test even the most resilient of people. 

Understanding Australia is paramount to your immigration survival and to give you a realistic view of the country, its people and how we see the world, read our regular blogs. Often humorous, sometimes challenging, but always food for thought.

What's a migration agent for?

Posted by Myer on July 23, 2014, 12:26 p.m. in Immigration

I’m sure that most people that I consult with wonder whether they could save themselves money and process the application themselves rather than incur the costs of using a registered migration agent. Until such time as you experience the migration process, it’s difficult to try to explain to a prospective client the value that we add to the process; however a recent client of ours probably appreciates the benefits of using a good registered migration agent more than most after his rather harrowing experience.

I consulted with a senior chef in South Africa in July 2013. Things progressed relatively smoothly in his particular case. He obtained the requisite score in his English language test, we obtained a positive skills assessment and his state sponsorship application was approved with, as we say in Australia “no dramas”.

We then went on to submit his visa application. It’s unusual to have problems at residence visa application stage. In our experience if problems do occur they usually occur at skills assessment or state sponsorship stage.

I was therefore shocked to say the least to receive an email from the Department of Immigration and Border Protection declining our client’s application without any prior correspondence.

In their opinion we had miscalculated our client’s points for work experience because they were of the opinion that the appropriate qualification for a chef was not a trade level qualification but rather an Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma and they were of the opinion that 3 years of work experience would be deducted from our client’s total years of work experience in lieu of the correct level of qualification.

Unfortunately the skills assessment opinion was silent as to the date when our client was regarded as suitably skilled for the nominated occupation however we were convinced that our interpretation of policy was correct and the Departments was incorrect.

We attempted to point out to the Department the error in their interpretation and after politely responding to our submissions still held the view that their interpretation was correct and that as decisions cannot be overturned there was no further point to engaging in additional correspondence and suggested we appeal the decision. Problem is that only applicants or sponsors onshore can appeal decisions and we didn’t think it would be likely that the sponsoring state government would appeal the decision.

I had to make a decision as to what to tell my client. Whilst I try to limit the amount of anxiety and worry on the part of my clients I feel obligated to keep them informed of developments and I had to break the news of the decline decision to my clients who were understandably shattered. I undertook to do whatever I possibly could to reverse the decision however although they didn’t express their concerns to me I think that after reading the communication from the Department about an inability to reverse decisions they were less than optimistic.

All of this transpired whilst I was on a business trip and fortunately for me I have a very good team in the Melbourne office. They contacted the skills assessing authority who backed our interpretation of policy and to their credit were excellent in drafting a letter clarifying the interpretation of policy which we sent on to the Department.

After several anxious weeks the Department reversed the decision and approved our client’s application.

After the cheers in our offices died down and our hands stopped throbbing after all the high fives, in a more reflective mood, we contemplated our role and how, but for our intervention, this application would surely have been declined.

Our client, were he processing this application himself, would probably accept the decision at face value or if he was astute enough to contact the skills assessing authority, he would most likely not know the right questions to ask in order to get the response that would be required to challenge the Department’s decision. Assuming somehow that the required response was obtained from the assessing authority, he would then need to know how to escalate matters to more senior staff within the Department. Based on our previous experience, the Department would almost certainly not entertain his requests as these would not be couched in the relevant legal framework and he would probably be given the usual response that he can consider appealing the outcome. As I have noted above, overseas applicants cannot appeal. Only state and family sponsors can and states in principle do not appeal on behalf of individual applicants. The most likely outcome would be that our client would be caught up between the usual departmental red tape and call centres resulting in a financial loss to him in excess of AU$7000 in government application fees.

Whilst decisions like this are thankfully rare, the benefit that we bring to the process is often more subtle yet our involvement makes a material difference to the outcome of a client’s application in so many different ways.

We are in no way miracle workers but we do know the legal framework within which immigration decisions are situated and we know an error when we see one. This is based on our years of experience and the volume of work we have handled over the years. A Departmental error like this can never get past us. We also do know how to point out an error like this in a professional way and ask for a decision to be revisited due to a legal error having been made. This is unusual but certainly possible if you raise it in the right way with all the supporting evidence and documentation to back up your claim. I would go so far as to say this can only be done by a migration professional.

The decision to migrate to another country is probably the most important one you’ll ever make in your life. Migration is not a cheap exercise and real professional advice that has the potential to make a tangible difference where it matters is invaluable. I realise that the temptation is there to cut costs but doing so may result in an even higher cost, both financially and personally, later down the track particularly if there is an unexpected turn of events such as the one we encountered and successfully overcame. In the end, when you engage a migration agent to act on your behalf, what you are really paying for is professionalism, experience and peace of mind. 


State sponsorship: A comparative analysis

Posted by Anka on July 17, 2014, 5:05 p.m. in Immigration

There is a widespread misconception that obtaining sponsorship from a state is a straightforward process and having your occupation on the relevant list is all that’s required. This is quite far from the truth as we say time and again that having your occupation on a given list is no guarantee that sponsorship will be secured from that state.

Another thing applicants always forget is that there are 6 states and 2 territories in Australia and each have their own rules and criteria and ways of dealing with applications which often differ significantly.

I therefore decided to write a short blog article comparing the advantages and disadvantages of applying for sponsorship from the 8 jurisdictions in Australia. Let’s go in alphabetical order so no claims of favouritism can be made!

 

ACT

 

Advantages

- Wide range of occupations

- Low unemployment rate

- Applicants with close family members living in Canberra can access ‘closed’ occupations

- No additional criteria imposed on occupations (such as years of work experience, particular specialisation or registration in Australia)

 

Disadvantages

- IELTS 7 required for Speaking if the occupation is ‘open’

- IELTS 7 required for all 4 components if occupation is ‘limited’

- ‘Limited’ occupations need to be verified to confirm availability of jobs

- Not available to applicants living in another Australian state or territory

- Application fee payable

 

http://www.canberrayourfuture.com.au/workspace/uploads/documents/act-occupation-list-24-february-14c.pdf 

 

New South Wales

 

Advantages

- Highly attractive as many people want to live in Sydney

- Reasonably wide range of occupations

- No additional criteria imposed on occupations (such as years of work experience, particular specialisation or registration in Australia)

- No additional English language requirements (IELTS 6 being sufficient)

- Family members elsewhere in Australia not a problem

 

Disadvantages

- Very inefficient online application system

- High degree of competition for limited places

- Long processing time (3 months)

- Application fee payable

 

http://www.business.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/25147/NSW-State-Occupation-List.pdf

 

Northern Territory 

 

Advantages

 

- No additional English language requirements (IELTS 6 being sufficient) for most occupations

- Reasonable range of occupations for a small economy

- Any occupation can be nominated if positive employment prospects can be shown or if family members living in the NT

- Strict financial requirements which must be evidenced through documentation

- No application fee payable

 

Disadvantages

 

- ICT and some other occupations require job offers

 

http://www.australiasnorthernterritory.com.au/Working/bsm/nt-nominated-general/Pages/sol.aspx 

 

Queensland

 

Advantages

 

- Separate and much larger list for provisional visa (Subclass 489)

- Only two years of post-qualification work experience required

 

Disadvantages

 

- List heavily focused on health occupations

- Registration required if compulsory in Queensland

- Some occupations require a job offer in Queensland

- Need to express interest first and be invited by the state government

- Application fee payable

 

http://migration.qld.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/pdf/qsol-skilled-190.pdf

 

http://migration.qld.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/pdf/qsol-skilled-489.pdf

 

South Australia

 

Advantages

 

- Wide range of occupations

- Only 12 months of work experience required in the last 36 months

- Willing to accept work experience in a skilled occupation other than the nominated one

- IELTS requirements commensurate with the level of the nominated occupation

- Quick processing time (around 3-4 weeks)

- Family members elsewhere in Australia not a problem

- 489 holders can live in Adelaide

- No application fee

 

Disadvantages

 

- None

 

https://www.migration.sa.gov.au/snol_data 

 

Tasmania

 

Advantages

 

- Wide range of occupations

- Good prospects if you have studied there or have family in Tasmania

- Subclass 489 holders can live in Hobart

 

Disadvantages

 

- Most applicants require jobs

 

http://www.migration.tas.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/41927/List_SMP_2013-2014_25_Sept_2013.pdf

 

Victoria

 

Advantages

 

- No application fee

- Reasonable range of occupations

 

Disadvantages

 

- Trades occupations require 5 years of work experience 

- Having family in another part of Australia works against you

- All applications subject to a positive opinion from an industry panel 

- Provisional sponsorships (Subclass 489) require a job offer in regional Victoria

 

http://www.liveinvictoria.vic.gov.au/visas-and-immigrating/occupation-lists/state-nomination-occupation-list-for-victoria 

 

Western Australia

 

Advantages

 

- Reasonably wide range of occupations

- Relatively quick processing

 

Disadvantages

 

- IELTS 7 required for certain occupations

- At least three years of work experience required if applying from overseas

- Need to express interest first and be invited by the state government

- Application fee payable

- Some occupations require a job offer in Western Australia

- Application involves specific questions relating to life in Western Australia

- Provisional sponsorship (Subclass 489) may require a job offer or evidence of employment prospects

 

http://www.migration.wa.gov.au/SKILLEDMIGRATION/Pages/Occupationsindemand.aspx

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/.

 

Singapore - 26 July

Seminar being held at Orchard Hotel on Saturday, 26 July at 11 am

Consultations being held at Orchard Hotel on 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 July. 

 

Hong Kong - 2 August

Seminar being held at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers in Kowloon on Saturday, 2 August at 11 am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on 2, 3, 4 and 5 August

 

South Africa

Johannesburg – 31 July

Seminar being held at The Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday, 31 July at 7 pm

Consultations being held at The Michaelangelo Hotel on 1, 2, 3, 17 and 18 August.

 

Cape Town – 4 August

Seminar being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on Monday, 4 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on 5 and 6 August.

 

Durban – 7 August

Seminar being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on Thursday, 7 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 8, 9 and 10 August.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  11 August

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on Monday, 11 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 August.


Onwards and upwards for the Socceroos

Posted by Anka on July 10, 2014, 5:35 p.m. in Lifestyle

I don’t know about you but we at IMMagine have been gripped by World Cup fever since the last few weeks. Now that the cup is almost over and everyone is looking forward to the grand final on Sunday (Monday morning our time here!), it’s probably a good time to reflect on what the World Cup meant for Australia.

The first blow to Australia was dealt when the draw for the 2014 FIFA World Cup was held in Brazil in December last year and we were placed in the same group as Spain, the Netherlands and Chile, in other words, the title holders, the finalists and a very strong South American side respectively. No one believed for one minute that Australia could get out of this group. 

In the end, those predictions were not too far off. Australia did end up losing all three of its games and finished bottom of the group with 0 points and a -6 goal difference placing 30th out of 32 teams. This doesn’t sound so promising on paper but many Australians, including myself, believe that the final standings do not reflect the true quality of the football that the Socceroos have played and that we have much to be hopeful for particularly in connection with the 2015 AFC Asian Cup to be held in Australia next January.

The World Cup is a tournament and how far a team goes in any given World Cup has a lot to do with what teams they get in the draw and who they end up playing if they manage to make it out of the group. There is no doubt that Australia was placed in what was probably one of the toughest World Cup groups ever in which the previous title holders Spain were eliminated after only two games! In contrast, the other three teams representing, like Australia, the Asian Football Confederation (AFC), namely Iran, Japan and South Korea, found themselves in much more balanced groups where they may have advanced had it not been for the less-than-mediocre football they played. It is my view, which is shared by many fans here and beyond, that Australia with their performance in such a difficult group would have had a good chance to advance had they been in the place of one of the other Asian teams.

The fact that the next edition of the Asian Cup will be held in Australia between 9 and 31 January 2015 and the promising football played by the team in this World Cup gives me and other fans renewed hope that Australia may be able to clinch the title for the first time on home ground in 6 months’ time! The host cities for that event will be Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Newcastle and Brisbane with no less than 7 games being played right here in Melbourne including 6 group games and one of the quarter finals. Australia’s group has South Korea, Oman and Kuwait. If Australia tops its group, the quarter final in Melbourne will feature Australia against the second-placed team from Group B which will be one of Uzbekistan, Saudi Arabia, PR China or North Korea. All in all, a very exciting prospect!

As everyone knows, soccer has never been the most popular sport in Australia. However, we are a sports-loving nation and soccer is still right up there with Australian Rules football, rugby (league and union) and cricket. The team, now fondly nicknamed Socceroos, was first formed in 1922 but did not have much of a showing on the world stage until their qualification for and participation in the 1974 FIFA World Cup where they managed a draw against Chile and lost to East and West Germany. 

We had to wait until 2006 for Australia’s next qualification to the World Cup. This one was a different proposition to 1974 though and Australia came second and progressed from a group which also had Brazil, Croatia and Japan. In the round of 16 game, we played Italy and lost 1-0 by the barest of margins to the eventual champions. That group of Socceroos was seen as the ‘golden generation’ of Australian soccer. 

In countries with large migrant populations like Australia, playing a sport has traditionally been one of the best ways to integrate into the community and it has been no different here. As far as soccer is concerned, children of many Greek, Italian and Croatian migrants having inherited their forebears’ interest in soccer went on to play the sport in local and national leagues in Australia with many making it onto the Socceroos squad. This proud tradition continues to this day with the current Australian squad having Australian-born children of migrants from Croatia, Greece, Italy, Slovenia, the Netherlands, Japan, Indonesia, Samoa and the UK. The captain of the team, Mile Jedinak, is the son of Croatian migrants and the coach Ange Postecoglou was born in Greece.

As a country where almost 50% of the population has at least one parent born overseas, the diversity of our national team is perhaps not surprising. It is that diversity that will hopefully produce the next golden generation of Australian players and, who knows, maybe your children could be part of that future if you decide to make Australia your home.

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/.

 

Singapore - 26 July

Seminar being held at Orchard Hotel on Saturday, 26 July at 11 am

Consultations being held at Orchard Hotel on 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 July. 

 

Hong Kong - 2 August

Seminar being held at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers in Kowloon on Saturday, 2 August at 11 am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on 2, 3, 4 and 5 August

 

South Africa

Johannesburg – 31 July

Seminar being held at The Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday, 31 July at 7 pm

Consultations being held at The Michaelangelo Hotel on 1, 2, 3, 17 and 18 August.

 

Cape Town – 4 August

Seminar being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on Monday, 4 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on 5 and 6 August.

 

Durban – 7 August

Seminar being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on Thursday, 7 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 8, 9 and 10 August.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  11 August

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on Monday, 11 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 August.


Get me a visa so I can get a job!

Posted by Myer on July 2, 2014, 4:17 p.m. in Lifestyle

Australian employers overwhelmingly want candidates to have work rights and be physically present in Australia. They want you to have work rights so that they don’t have to act as sponsors which is what they would have to do if your visa does not entitle you to work in Australia.

Many of you are going to qualify for general skilled migration visas, all of which have full work rights for all family members and this is our preferred method of migration to Australia. Some of these general skilled migration visas are permanent residence visas and others are temporary visas [a pathway to obtaining permanent residence] but all have work rights.

Some of you are not going to be eligible for general skilled migration visas and might have to try to obtain an offer of employment, and sponsorship by an employer but this is the more difficult route [a route I referred to as the “bleeding knuckle route” at my seminar because you will have to knock on doors until your knuckles bleed].

It’s more difficult route because, unless you have work rights associated with your visa, employers will have to act as sponsors which includes making onerous undertakings to the Australian Government such as agreeing to repatriate you and your family and making financial commitments to training the Australian workforce.

It’s therefore a far easier option for an employer to recruit a migrant who has work rights even though that migrant might be less qualified.

Australian employers like to meet people face-to-face and securing a job offer is as much about your personality profile and attitude as it is your skills. This is why you need to be in Australia. It displays a level of commitment and readiness that you simply can’t achieve sitting in your home country.

A lot of Australian employers don’t really know what they need until they really need it, or in many cases until it's too late. This is why most of them won’t entertain offshore applications, because they have no idea of when you might be ready to start, and they wanted you yesterday.

You can use recruiters but don’t rely on them. I know this for a fact. A lot of recruiters overlook good quality migrants, because to them, a migrant is in the too hard basket. They present a delay in achieving their commission and as such get filed under ‘R’ for ‘Recycling’. The good ones do deal with migrants and see the skills and expertise rather than the quick commission cheque, but they aren't in ready supply. So don’t expect all recruiters to be able to solve your job search woes.

Going directly to employers is the key, alongside direct networking, LinkedIn, Facebook and industry events. Get out there and make yourself visible. Talk to people in the business, make phone calls (yes cold calls) and get your details spread far and wide. Don’t just sit in your hotel/motel room, friend’s house or Starbucks on free Wi-Fi sending your CV via online portals. It won’t work. Yes online search engines such as www.seek.com.au are useful and a good way to find jobs and employers but if you are sitting in Australia sending your CV out, you might as well be anywhere else in the world (refer to previous paragraph).

Finally, there are a few rules around ‘selling yourself’ that you need to bear in mind, after all this is essentially the key to it all – marketing yourself effectively to employers.

 

Some do’s:

Keep your CV simple, effective and relevant.

Tailor your CV and cover letter to the role you are applying for.

Build your LinkedIn profile and use this to network with people in the industry, but don’t ‘over-connect’.

Research the companies you are applying to, find out who they are, what they do and their core business values and goals (you can usually find this all on their website).

Contact industry associations or professional bodies as they may have a jobs board or ideas on how to reach fellow professionals.

Prepare yourself for the call/walk in, show you are serious and have done the research.

Be presentable, you can never ‘dress up’ at an interview if you are too casual; but you can dress down if your interviewers aren’t dressed as formally (remove the tie, jacket etc).

 

Some don’ts:

Don’t add a photo to your CV. Even if you fancy yourself as a GQ/Vogue model, leave it out.

Don’t overdo the task list in your CV’s. Keep it relatively short and focussed. Add in key achievements to show you not only can do the job but can do it well.

Don’t add in qualifications that you haven’t finished. This is a particularly strange trait for many countries. If you didn’t complete a degree, you don’t have a degree.

Don’t be over confident. Employers like confidence but not arrogance. Remember to talk about your skills and how you can accomplish the tasks required. You don’t have to talk about whether you met the queen or toured with Led Zeppelin.

Don’t put anything on your CV that you can’t explain. Nothing goes against you more than not being able to recall details from your CV accurately and clearly.

There are many other tips and tools that we utilise in the job search process but ultimately it comes down to hard work, patience and knocking on as many doors as you can.

For anyone out there doing this, good luck and for those of you out there contemplating doing this, hopefully the above gives you a little bit of guidance along the way.

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/.

 

Singapore - 26 July

Seminar being held at Orchard Hotel on Saturday, 26 July at 11 am

Consultations being held at Orchard Hotel on 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 July. 

 

Hong Kong - 2 August

Seminar being held at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers in Kowloon on Saturday, 2 August at 11 am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on 2, 3, 4 and 5 August

 

South Africa

Johannesburg – 31 July

Seminar being held at The Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday, 31 July at 7 pm

Consultations being held at The Michaelangelo Hotel on 1, 2, 3, 17 and 18 August.

 

Cape Town – 4 August

Seminar being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on Monday, 4 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on 5 and 6 August.

 

Durban – 7 August

Seminar being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on Thursday, 7 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 8, 9 and 10 August.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  11 August

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on Monday, 11 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 August.


Accountants dodge a bullet (sort of!)

Posted by Myer on June 18, 2014, 12:21 p.m. in Migration Quota

The Australian media has reported that the number of accountants allowed entry to Australia under the general skilled migration visa program will be cut from almost 10,000 per annum to about 5000. Each occupational group that is eligible for skilled migration to Australia is subject to an occupational ceiling which can be no more than 6% of that occupation’s workforce in Australia. The good news is that the occupation still appears on the Skilled Occupations List (SOL) which means that for the lucky 5000 accountants each year scoring sufficient points, they won’t need to apply for a state-sponsored visa.

It has long since been the source of conjecture in our industry as to when accountants would be removed from the Skilled Occupations List and relegated to the Consolidated Skilled Occupations List (CSOL). Occupations that only appear on the CSOL must have sponsorship from a state to make an application.

The Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA), an independent body, developed the SOL based on labour market, education and training, migration and general economic and demographic data and stakeholder submissions back in 2010. Since then, AWPA advises the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) every year as to the occupations that it recommends to be kept on the SOL.

The Skilled Occupation List identifies occupations where independent skilled migrants will assist in meeting the medium and long term skill needs of the Australian economy. Independent migrants with skills in these occupations will assist in meeting skill needs that cannot be met through employer and state sponsored migration programs, or efforts aimed at employing, training, skilling and up-skilling Australians.

In addition, AWPA flags a number of occupations each year which are borderline in terms of their inclusion on the SOL. In 2014, there were 54 such occupations including the three accounting occupations. Some of the other occupations that were flagged by AWPA included various engineering, IT and some trades occupations. AWPA will continue to monitor these occupations for significant changes in labour market conditions and advise the Department accordingly in the coming years.

This year, the decision was made in the end to keep accountants on the SOL as the arguments in favour of the demand increasing for this occupation in the short to medium term were seen as being more compelling. It’s thought that the changes to taxation law and regulations will lead to a greater need for qualified accountants in Australia over the next few years.

I should also clarify that by accountants I’m not necessarily referring to chartered accountants. The bar as to who is considered to be an accountant in Australia is set fairly low, namely someone with 9 of the 12 courses that one would complete in Australia as part of a Bachelor of Accounting degree.

One doesn’t need any work experience to be classified as an accountant either, just good English language ability.

In the current immigration year [which ends on 30 June], 5475 accountants were invited to apply. 

As far as implications for the new immigration year are concerned, if the same level of demand occurs next year we will probably see pass marks for accountants start to rise in the latter months of the immigration year while accountants submitting expressions of interest prior to December 2015 should face a relatively low pass mark of 60 points.

Accountants need not panic at this stage however the drastic cut in the numbers does signal a concern for accountants and further trimming of the numbers could occur in the years to follow.

We would suggest any accountants thinking of migration to Australia need to act sooner rather than later.

On the whole, it’s more likely going forward that the Australian Government will continue to keep the SOL relatively stable as it has been for the last 4 years and regulate the entry of skilled professionals into the country through modifying the occupational ceilings as may be necessitated by labour market conditions. 

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/.

 

Singapore - 26 July

Seminar being held at Orchard Hotel on Saturday, 26 July at 11 am

Consultations being held at Orchard Hotel on 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 July. 

 

Hong Kong - 2 August

Seminar being held at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers in Kowloon on Saturday, 2 August at 11 am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on 2, 3, 4 and 5 August

 

South Africa

Johannesburg – 31 July

Seminar being held at The Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday, 31 July at 7 pm

Consultations being held at The Michaelangelo Hotel on 1, 2, 3, 17 and 18 August.

 

Cape Town – 4 August

Seminar being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on Monday, 4 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on 5 and 6 August.

 

Durban – 7 August

Seminar being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on Thursday, 7 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 8, 9 and 10 August.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  11 August

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on Monday, 11 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 August.


More occupations eligible for independent migration

Posted by Myer on June 13, 2014, 12:47 p.m. in Immigration

Only a fool would speculate on the occupations to be included on the skilled occupations list with only 21 days to go prior to a new list being published and taking effect. Could I be just the fool to speculate? I have done so in the past only to be wearing egg on my face when the new list has been produced. 

These were my thoughts whilst driving to work today, only to discover that earlier today an announcement had been made by the Assistant Minister for Immigration and Border Protection that Chefs, Bricklayers and Wall and Floor Tilers will be added to the Skilled Occupation List from July 1 to ease skills shortages in these occupations in Australia and that no occupations were going to be taken off the current skilled occupations list.

I have therefore decided to discuss the significance of the skilled occupations list and how it is compiled and with some relief will not be wearing egg on my face this year. Yellow is not a particularly good colour for me and besides it clashes with the rest of my wardrobe.

The skilled occupations list is based on the input Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA) which works independently of the government to provide annual recommendations on the composition of the SOL to ensure it responds to Australia's changing skill needs.

The reason why bricklayers and tilers have been added to the list is because of an increase in demand predicted for these occupations as well as a decrease in apprenticeship completions.

With regard to chefs, this occupation has been added to the skilled occupations list because of a shortage of chefs coupled with strong growth projected in the café and restaurant sector.

No existing occupations are being removed from the SOL, which currently lists 188 occupations that Australia needs. This means that there will be 191 occupations on the SOL in the 2014-15 migration year.

I like to think of the skilled occupations list as being a list of occupations that is in short supply in all states in Australia.

There is another list of occupations called the Consolidated Skilled Occupations List (CSOL) that lists all the occupations considered to be “skilled” in Australia and different states may, from time to time sponsor applicants in occupations on the CSOL depending upon the perceived needs of that particular state.

Chefs, bricklayers and wall and floor tilers were already on the CSOL right from the start but will be “promoted” to the skilled occupations list from 1 July.

For those of us that have been operating in the immigration industry for a while, it’s with some irony that the occupation of chef has been reinstated to the skilled occupations list. In 2009, it was one of the occupations along with cooks and hairdressers vilified as producing poor settlement outcomes for Australia when students were accused of completing “sandwich” courses with a view to accessing a fast track to obtaining permanent residence in Australia.

The significance for chefs, bricklayers and wall and floor tilers means that, if they can score sufficient points under one of the general skilled migration visas, they won’t need to seek state sponsorship and can qualify for the type of visa that allows them to migrate to any particular state in Australia as opposed to a state-sponsored visa which requires residence obligations to a particular state.

Perhaps they are at the forefront of occupations likely to benefit from a lower Australian dollar. It wasn’t so long ago that the Australian dollar was valued at 1.08 American dollars but has fallen to a current rate of .94 American dollars. Industries such as hospitality and tourism are going to benefit from the lower Australian dollar as has the construction industry benefited from the lowest interest rates in Australia since 1990. Perhaps we are at the vanguard of a range of allied occupations that are going to be in increasingly short supply in Australia in the months ahead.

It’s also significant that no occupations are going to be culled from the skilled occupations list, this notwithstanding certain occupations such as accountants, some types of IT specialists and certain types of engineers that were considered to be borderline in terms of their inclusion on the skilled occupations list. These occupations had been “flagged” by the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency and more information can be obtained from their website.

As immigration practitioners, this announcement is welcome news for us as it means that more people that we see will have access to an independent skilled visa and no one will lose out as all other current occupations have remained on the SOL. 

In actual fact, the Skilled Occupations List (SOL) has been remarkably stable since first being produced by the Department back in May 2010. Next week, we will be doing a follow up blog on the history of the SOL and why not having an occupation on the SOL is not the end of the world for an intending migrant so watch this space!

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/.

 

Singapore - 26 July

Seminar being held at Orchard Hotel on Saturday, 26 July at 11 am

Consultations being held at Orchard Hotel on 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 July. 

 

Hong Kong - 2 August

Seminar being held at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers in Kowloon on Saturday, 2 August at 11 am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on 2, 3, 4 and 5 August

 

South Africa

Johannesburg – 31 July

Seminar being held at The Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday, 31 July at 7 pm

Consultations being held at The Michaelangelo Hotel on 1, 2, 3, 17 and 18 August.

 

Cape Town – 4 August

Seminar being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on Monday, 4 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Southern Sun Newlands Hotel on 5 and 6 August.

 

Durban – 7 August

Seminar being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on Thursday, 7 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 8, 9 and 10 August.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  11 August

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on Monday, 11 August at 7 pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 August.


Should Australia be Looking to Botswana to Fill its Skills Shortages?

Posted by Kane on May 22, 2014, 5:19 p.m. in Eligibility

Immagine Australia has been travelling to a number of countries for years now with the discovery of many skilled applicants who are looking for a change in environment and ultimately a new place to live. Many make the move successfully due to the fact they have skills that are high in demand by Australian employers, and find it easy to integrate into a culture that is very welcoming to new migrants from all cultural backgrounds.

Over the years we have received enquiries from people living in Botswana who are looking for an option of moving to Australia. Those who decided to use our services have made a successful move to Australia and continue to invite their friends and family to join them.

South Africa is one of the countries that we visit on a regular basis and this year we decided to add a visit to Botswana as part of this tour. Given the enquiries we had from Batswana in the past, and also helping a number make the move to Australia, we suspected that there were many skilled people who were looking for a change and had Australia on their radar. 

I recently presented my first seminar in Botswana (Immagine’s second this year) to an audience of over 200 people and ultimately saw 35 people for a one-on-one consultation. I may have suspected that there were some skilled workers in Botswana but the quality of the potential candidates blew me away. Many of the people that I spoke to have the skills and experience that Australia is looking for. And there were many more in the audience who were unable to make a time to see me on this tour.

Which has prompted the question; should Australia be looking to Botswana to help fill skills needs? 

I say yes! 

Many of its citizens have skills, qualifications and experience that are suited to the Australian workforce and English being the language of business in both countries. 

Over the years many Batswana have travelled to Australia on government study grants, which provided a wonderful opportunity for its citizens to experience education in the country. Maybe the taste of this experience has provided a great motivation for many to return and live in Australia. 

After speaking with a number of people during my time in Botswana, the main motivation is greener pastures, better career opportunities, adventure and to join friends and family who have already made the move. Many people are looking for greater opportunities in a bigger economy and with South Africa not really offering a fantastic incentive, Australia would make an ideal place to settle. This is for a number of reasons;

 

  • Similar Climate— we have summers and winters at the same time of year being in the southern hemisphere. In fact in Australia, been so big offers a choice of seasons and climates to suit everyone.
  • Culture - Australia is a land of many cultures and the general laid-back attitude of people in Botswana would fit in perfectly with the general laid-back attitude in Australia
  • Employment opportunities - Australia has many opportunities for employment, so much so that we have a large shortage of skills. Most of those who I met would ultimately be up to find work in their field.
  • Business opportunities-Australia does promote business links between countries so it is possible that you could establish businesses in both countries.
  • Lifestyle – Although many I spoke to enjoy the lifestyle and safe environment of Botswana, there are some other attractions including beaches, rainforests, snow-skiing, road trips without a passport, music festivals, international sporting events, just to name a few. 

 

I have also had a number of clients tell me that they would work in Australia for 10 – 20 years and then retire in Botswana. And why not? One can build a very nice nest egg in Australia and take that with them to Botswana to retire and live a comfortable and financially independent lifestyle.

Whether it be for temporary work or permanent migration, I think we will be seeing many more Botswana citizens living and working in Australia and we hope to bring as many as possible to Australia to help fill the skills shortage. Already we have had a number go ahead with migration to Australia from our first two trips and we do expect many more throughout this year and beyond.

Our next seminar will be held on Monday 26 May at the Phakalane Golf Resort in Gaborone. The seminar is free to attend and you can reserve your booking at www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars


Should you swap Hong Kong for Australia?

Posted by Kane on May 16, 2014, 5:58 p.m. in Lifestyle

On 31 May, IMMagine Australia will be presenting its first seminar in Hong Kong. We are very excited about the opportunity to meet with its citizens and expats who are looking at possibly making a move to Australia.

Hong Kong differs greatly from most countries and cities in the world. It boasts Michelin-starred restaurants, a vibrant nightlife that doesn’t close down, low taxation, great career opportunities and access for Australia, Europe and American business into the Asian market. There is also the opportunity for travel to various nearby countries in Asia and I think Hong Kong would rival Singapore in the shopping championships. 

Hong Kong also has a work hard/play hard culture where it is not uncommon to work 12 hours a day and then have a 5–6 hour bender afterwards. 

Hong Kong certainly appears to be a place for young people who can live a sociable and party lifestyle before meeting and settling down with their soul mate. 

But is this everyone’s cup of tea?

Hong Kongers  work long hours which makes it hard to spend time with a young family. Apartment living is essential given the lack of space and you can forget about a garden. In fact with a population density of 6,747 people per square kilometre, you can almost forget about personal space. 

There is also the issue of air and water pollution brought about by rapid urbanisation. Other factors such as high stress work (hence the binge drinking), pressure on children to perform in school, cost of living and the price of shoe box apartments do give consideration to seek an alternative place to live.

For those who are looking at a change in lifestyle, Australia presents a wonderful place for Hong Kong citizens and expats. It is only a 9 hour flight, similar time zone, and lots of Asian influences. There are major cities that have a vibrant nightlife, major shopping brands and centres, award winning restaurants and cafes, Asian influences, and many similar experiences that one enjoys in Hong Kong. 

But on top that Australia also offers great educational opportunities, a work/life balance, clean air, fresh produce, great wineries and beaches, sporting facilities and events, and a vibrant and mixed cultural scene. Not to mention the space!  

Australia has a vast amount of space. With an average of 3 people per square kilometre, there is plenty of room to have a backyard with a garden, a place for the kids to play in private, have a pet(s) and host BBQ’s in the summertime. It is nice to know that you don’t have to pay a fortune to be stuck to your neighbour’s wall. So no one can hear your private conversations and karaoke at home can be turned up at full volume.

There is a great natural environment with many accessible national parks, places to drive long distances and some of the best beaches in the world. A great benefit of the space is the clear skies and clean air. There is nothing like escaping the city for a weekend to go camping in the bush and going hiking in some of the nicest natural scenery in the world. Or you can book accommodation if you prefer.

Australia offers great education without the considerable stress placed on kids. Kids are able to be kids and play with their friends without the pressure of having to be the highest achiever. There are also great employment opportunities and the ability to have a balanced work/play lifestyle. Most people would only work 8 hours per day and certainly not on weekends. 40 hour weeks are commonplace.

In terms of culture, Australia attracts top performers in music, arts, comedy and sport on a regular basis and offers something for everyone. Australia is a sporting nation with many participating in events and activities on a regular weekly basis. Almost all sports are represented in Australia including football, rugby, soccer, tennis, crochet, bowls, badminton, basketball, just to name a few. There are also a host of major events including the Australian Open Tennis, Test match Cricket and the Formula One Grand Prix.

And if you do like golf, there are an abundance of golf courses available. I have about 10 courses within 10 kilometres of my house. And on most occasions I also can get a round in without having to make a booking.

Whilst Hong Kong is one of the great cities of the world, Australia offers a great alternative for those who are looking for a change in environment and lifestyle, for both Hong Kong citizens and expats.

I now have to plant my winter vegetables in my garden, but I look forward to seeing you in Hong Kong on 31 May.

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/

 

South Africa

 

Durban – 19 May

Seminar being held at the Riverside Hotel on Monday 19 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 20 and 21 May

 

Johannesburg – 22 May

Seminar being held at the Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday 22 May at 7pm

Consultations being held in Auckland Park (address to be advised) on 23, 24, 25 and 26 May and 1 and 2 June.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  26 May

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on 26 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 May.

 

Hong Kong - 31 May

Seminar being held at Kowloon at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on Saturday 31 May at 11am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers from 1 June to 6 June

 

Singapore - 7 June

Seminar being held at the Grand Pacific Hotel on Saturday 7 June at 11am

Consultations being held at the Shangri La Hotel on 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 June 


Did someone say elections?

Posted by Anka on May 13, 2014, 4:59 p.m. in Immigration

It’s not often that we write a blog article about elections in another country. However, given that we visit South Africa at least once every two months and assist so many South Africans in their applications for migration to Australia, we do take an inevitable interest in the political developments in South Africa which of course includes the recent elections. 

What we found most interesting about the election results this year was not so much the results themselves but the extent to which it was seen almost as a non-event around the world, including here in Australia where we have a sizeable South African community.

It seems that the fifth victory in a row of the ANC was not enough to fire up the imagination, hopes and dreams of the masses as the first one did back in 1994. That’s not to say that the election results were not interesting. They provide subtle clues as to what we may expect to see in South Africa’s political landscape in the second twenty years after the fall of apartheid.

The ANC clearly remains a force to be reckoned with in South African politics but, this term, they will be facing criticism both from the right and from the left in the form of the DA and the EFF respectively. In the last term, the implosion of COPE with its internal infighting and the split in the IFP meant that the main opposition to the ANC came from the DA and it is always difficult to sell a more liberal economic message to large masses that suffer from poverty.

That’s not all though. Political analysts believe that ANC lost votes to the EFF and to a lesser extent the DA in these elections while picking up the votes that had gone to COPE in 2009. In other words, had COPE managed to remain relevant, the decrease in the ANC’s popularity may have become more apparent in these elections thereby giving the opposition sustained hope for an eventual change of government perhaps through a loose alliance of sorts. That didn’t happen because COPE didn’t last long enough and the IFP effectively split in two with the formation of the National Freedom Party (NFP). The split of the IFP also gave the DA the opportunity to become the official opposition in KwaZulu-Natal.

In successful democracies, governments change at the ballot box. Having said that, it is also true that liberation movements tend to stay in power for several election cycles following liberation sometimes up to 40 years. It should also not be forgotten that only about 3/4th of the voting age population is enrolled to vote in South Africa and of this again only about a 3/4th portion went to the polls. This means that there are millions of potentially disaffected voters that did not have a say in the outcome of these elections. Winning the trust and votes of this silent majority may be what any credible opposition in South Africa needs to do as their strategy going forward.

Reading the above, you might be forgiven for thinking that the 2014 South African elections have generated lively debate in Australia. Sadly, this isn’t so. Our microcosmos of an office in Melbourne is not really representative of the Australian public in this particular regard. There was brief mention of the elections coming up and later the results on TV channels ABC and SBS and a few scattered articles in the media including The Australian but that was pretty much all.

The coverage that we did see noted the victory of the ANC as an expected outcome while also pointing out the gains made by the opposition, in particular the DA and the EFF. Prior to the elections, the corruption allegations levelled against President Zuma did feature in the news here in Australia from time to time. Following the elections, some editorials pointed out the ANC would need to address the high level of unemployment in the country as well as falling standards in health and education.

But what does this all mean from the perspective of your average South African who may be mulling over the prospect of making the move to Australia?

Well, it really depends. Issues such as crime, corruption, and falling standards in services, including health and education, are nothing new. Those who were hoping for a stronger opposition to emerge following these elections may therefore be disillusioned. As noted above, the shift in the political landscape will eventually happen but it may take 3 or 4 more electoral cycles before it becomes a reality. The question then is what to do? This is an intensely personal question which we do not purport to answer for you. What we do offer is genuine advice and guidance for those who want to determine their eligibility for migration to Australia.

The average person everywhere in the world is more concerned with economics than politics. Your average South African worries about crime, job security, the future of the Rand and whether it will sink to the historic lows of the early 2000’s and the fall in educational standards. What would happen for instance if the fall in educational standards meant that South African qualifications are not seen as being at a high enough level for intending migrants? This would have major implications on the ability of potential migrants wanting to get their skills assessed for their visa applications. What would be the impact on the intending migrant if the Rand slips further against the Australian dollar and the potential cost of migrating out the country goes up by 50%? These are all practical questions that need to be considered if a person is seriously thinking about migration.

Whilst migration is a scary process and quitting jobs, selling houses, saying goodbye to friends and family members is not for the fainthearted, it would also seem to be a scary prospect considering migration at some future point in time bearing in mind the considerations in the preceding paragraph.

We have no idea as to how many South Africans are considering migration as an alternative to what looks like an extended term in office by the ANC. You might say that our exposure to South Africa is limited to those disenchanted with the policies of the current government. That's not to say that one has to be a sworn opponent of the ANC to be unhappy with the way things are in South Africa. Not at all. We only need to look back at the recent and very public pronouncements of Desmond Tutu in this regard. Indeed, recent evidence suggests that many ANC voters are also dissatisfied but not really convinced regarding the existence of a viable alternative at this point in time. Many also vote for the ANC for nostalgic or romantic reasons. The real test the opposition faces in South Africa is to win over the disenchanted, the urban poor and the born frees and convince them that they can do a better job. Having said all this, it is probably also true that we don’t see many of the optimists out there who have decided never to migrate from South Africa.

With the number of people that we see in consultations and those that attend our seminars, it’s difficult to imagine that there are South Africans out there that are not and will never contemplate migration but these individuals are probably not your average South Africans that are affected by crime, violence, deteriorating educational standards, affirmative action programs, devaluing currency to name some of the factors driving migration from South Africa.

If you are not exactly thrilled at the prospect of another 5 years under the present government and cannot wait 3 or 4 more electoral cycles for eventual change, perhaps you should consider attending one of our free immigration seminars in South Africa in May details of which are as follows:

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/

 

South Africa

Cape Town – 15 May

Seminar being held at the Commodore Hotel on Thursday 15 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Commodore Hotel on 16 and 17 May

 

Durban – 19 May

Seminar being held at the Riverside Hotel on Monday 19 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 20 and 21 May

 

Johannesburg – 22 May

Seminar being held at the Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday 22 May at 7pm

Consultations being held in Auckland Park (address to be advised) on 23, 24, 25 and 26 May and 1 and 2 June.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  26 May

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on 26 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 May.


It gets even better for engineers!

Posted by Anka on May 9, 2014, 4:07 p.m. in Migration Quota

This article is a direct follow up to our blog dated 26 March 2014 which discussed the positive implications for engineers of a recent change made in the SkillSelect system.

The change that I’m referring to was introduced by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) to take effect from 1 March 2014 and raised the minimum ceiling for each occupational group under the SkillSelect system to 1000 invitations.

Our original article of 26 March 2014 discussed why this was really good news for engineers and what we could expect to happen following this change in the near future. I’m very happy to report that the forecasts we made in that article have been proven accurate and prescient by the selections made from the pool in the time that’s elapsed since.

The increase in the minimum ceiling for all occupational groups to 1000 impacted a large number of occupations. However, the most notable impact was on certain engineering occupations for which high numbers of EOI’s had been received and invitations were therefore being issued on a pro-rata basis in each invitation round. Because of the high number of applications, these occupations were also subject to a higher cut-off for points and earlier dates of effect with regard to EOI selections compared to other occupations. The engineering occupations in question were:

-          Chemical Engineers

-          Materials Engineers

-          Electronics Engineers

-          Telecommunications Engineer

-          Telecommunications Network Engineer

-          Aeronautical Engineer

-          Environmental Engineer

-          Biomedical Engineer

-          Agricultural Engineer

-          Naval Architect

-          Engineering Technologist

        Acoustic Engineer

-          Mechatronics Engineer

-          Product Design Engineer

At this point, you may be wondering about two things: How does the cut-off for points work and what on earth is a date of effect? These are very logical questions to ask and I'll aim to explain.

In the SkillSelect system, Expressions of Interest (EOI’s) are ranked by points score. The highest ranked applicants are invited to apply for the relevant visa. For applicants who have equal points scores, the time at which they reached their points score for that subclass (referred to as the visa date of effect) determines their order of invitation. EOI’s with earlier dates of effect are invited before those with later dates.

We can see the improvement in both cut-off points and dates of effect for the 4 occupational groups containing the above occupations by looking at the selections made on 24 February, just before the changes took effect, and on 28 April, which is the most recent selection:

 

In the selection of 24 February, the relevant selection points and cut-off dates for the 4 occupational groups in question were as follows:

- Chemical and Materials Engineers, 75 points, all applications lodged on or before 22/02/2014 5.24 pm

- Electronics Engineers, 65 points, all application lodged on or before 14/01/2014 at 1.25 pm

- Other Engineering Professionals, 75 points, all applications lodged on or before 03/02/2014 11.31 pm

- Telecommunication Engineering Professionals, 70 points, all applications lodged on or before 14/02/2014 at 7.26 pm

 

Now let’s look at the same points and dates for the most recent selection made on 28 April:

- Chemical and Materials Engineers, 60 points, all applications lodged on or before 08/03/2014 at 1.18 pm

- Electronics Engineers, 60 points, all applications lodged on or before 21/03/2014 at 2.07 pm

- Other Engineering Professionals, 60 points, all applications lodged on or before 09/03/2014 at 10.39 pm

- Telecommunications Engineering Professionals, 60 points, all applications lodged on or before 28/02/2014 at 7.40 pm

 

You can see that all four groups have improved dramatically in terms of selection points and cut-off dates over the course of the 4 selections made from the pool since the change was introduced. Not only has the selection point dropped to 60 for all 4 groups of occupations, but the cut-off dates have also approached the actual date of selection. Before the change was implemented, a person in one of the above occupations lodging on 60 points could not expect to be selected. Now they can expect to be selected within 6 to 8 weeks if lodging on 60 points and immediately if lodging on anything higher. This would have been unthinkable if the ceiling had not been raised to 1000.

In the article of 28 March, I had projected that the increased quotas would absorb much of the backlog for these 4 occupational groups and the selection points over time would most likely drop down to 60 as with all other occupations. This has already happened and has major positive implications for engineers looking to migrate to Australia.

For further updates in relation to selection points and cut-off dates, please continue to follow the news section of our website. We report on these on a fortnightly basis.

If you are interested in migrating to Australia and want to know more about the process, why don’t you attend one of our seminars? It’s a great way to start. Alternatively, you can send us an e-mail at info@immagine-immigration.com to organise a consultation.

 

Upcoming Seminars

Immagine Australia will be presenting a series of seminars in the locations below. To book, go to our website www.immagine-immigration.com/seminars/

 

South Africa

 

Cape Town – 15 May

Seminar being held at the Commodore Hotel on Thursday 15 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Commodore Hotel on 16 and 17 May

 

Durban – 19 May

Seminar being held at the Riverside Hotel on Monday 19 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Endless Horizons Boutique Hotel on 20 and 21 May

 

Johannesburg – 22 May

Seminar being held at the Michelangelo Hotel on Thursday 22 May at 7pm

Consultations being held in Auckland Park (address to be advised) on 23, 24, 25 and 26 May and 1 and 2 June.

 

Botswana - Gaborone -  26 May

Seminar being held at Phakalane Golf Estate on 26 May at 7pm

Consultations being held at the Phakalane Golf Estate on 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 May.

 

Hong Kong - 31 May

Seminar being held at Kowloon at The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers on Saturday 31 May at 11am

Consultations being held at the The Royal Pacific Hotel and Towers from 1 June to 6 June

 

Singapore - 7 June

Seminar being held at the Grand Pacific Hotel on Saturday 7 June at 11am

Consultations being held at the Shangri La Hotel on 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 June