Telephone:
+64 9 359 9319

Fax:
+64 9 359 9189

Physical Address:
Unit 2M, Level 2
55-57 High Street
Auckland City
Auckland, New Zealand

Postal Address:
P.O. Box 99606
Newmarket
Auckland, New Zealand

Immigration Blog

REGULAR POSTS FROM NEW ZEALAND & AUSTRALIA

No SMC pool draw for six months

The NZ government (in waiting) announced this morning that they will not be resuming skilled migrant ‘pool draws’ for another six months. They haven't done any since March this year anyway so this is hardly ‘news’, more a clarification of an existing position....

Iain

Share this post

No SMC pool draw for six months

The NZ government (in waiting) announced this morning that they will not be resuming skilled migrant ‘pool draws’ for another six months. They haven't done any since March this year anyway so this is hardly ‘news’, more a clarification of an existing position....

Iain

Share this post

No SMC pool draw for six months

Posted by Iain on Oct. 19, 2020, 10:35 a.m. in Skilled Migrant Category

 

The NZ government (in waiting) announced this morning that they will not be resuming skilled migrant ‘pool draws’ for another six months. They haven't done any since March this year anyway so this is hardly ‘news’, more a clarification of an existing position.

It has many people aflutter as usual but I don’t feel the fear.

I have written about why they stopped pool selections previously and to me the agenda was always clear – they got themselves into a right processing pickle with many skilled migrant resident visa applications sitting unallocated and unprocessed for up to 24 months because there was no ability of the Government to agree on the numbers in their residence program. In fact there hasn’t been a residence programme since the last one finished in December 2019. The numbers of resident visas available has never been made official so INZ was flying blind for much of 2019 given they had already filled the years ‘quota’. Naturally the immigration department stopped approving visas (or at best were on a go slow in terms of allocation) last year and the backlog grew larger and larger. A number of months ago they clearly got a nod and a wink from the political parties in the government to resume processing and approving residence as if there was a residence program with the same numbers of visa places available as in previous years.

INZ then was presented with a de facto residence programme but by the time they started to gear up on processing, the backlog had grown exponentially.

After Saturday’s landslide win by the Labour Party, the ‘handbrake’ that was the NZ First Party that sat around the cabinet table with the Labour party has been released. If you haven’t heard New Zealand First is gone from the Parliament and the Labour Party is the first political party since 1996 to be able to govern alone without any coalition partners or side agreements with minor parties.

This announcement does not mean they are closing down migration because traditionally the Labour Party has always been very pro-immigration given its traditional voting base. Turkeys don't vote for an early Christmas so I think we will return to the days where we had sensible policy and residence programmes allowing INZ to stay on top of numbers.

Not that INZ is faultless in the debacle that has been the past 18 months. In order to deal with the skilled migrant case backlog and under the smoke screen of Covid back in March INZ stopped doing pool selections. They said at the time it's because they had no ability to work remotely but that was clearly untrue because as soon as they went back to work pool draws did not resume.

We have been waiting for this announcement since March.

I said back in March when pool draws stopped that INZ was buying time to start dealing with that backlog. It was becoming embarrassing on so many levels, with unintended consequences and creating a whole lot of uncertainty for anyone trying to plan their move here. In fact, it was confirmed unofficially to me by a very senior manager a few months ago that the truth was INZ wanted to get rid of the resident visa backlog. They are currently around 18 months from receipt date to allocation of these resident visa applications which means they are starting to get ahead of where they have been over the past 12 months.

So what does the future hold?  When they start resuming the pool draws what will happen to the pass mark?

Government will have a number of options and in some ways we might be about to go back to the future:

1.      Simply increase the pass mark to be selected from the ‘pool’. That will instantly lower the number of applications flowing into the system but the problem with that is the more points people need, the more points they tend to get. When for example the pass mark went up to 160 many clients dealt with the signal by getting a job outside of Auckland (30 additional points) and continued to qualify. And the more points people need the less control Government has over the skills mix – for example a 26-year-old genius software developer with a job offer in New Zealand or the 27 year old teacher we are desperate to find might only ever be able to get 160 points. Putting the pass mark up to 180 and cutting them but allowing entry to a 36 year Master of Arts carrying Marketing Manager might not be the best outcome for NZ. Increasing the pass mark will certainly slow down the flow of applications into the system but will create other serious problems so I don't believe a higher pass mark is the solution. I don't believe it will solve any of the problems.

2.      Return to the days of multiple pass marks and prioritise selection based on whatever has the most positive impact. We could therefore see multiple different pass marks once again. It worked before and was relatively transparent. For example, if you work in an occupation that is on the long-term skills shortage list the pass mark might be 160 points. You might make it 190 points for people who do not work in an occupation on a skills shortage list. If you want people to go outside of Auckland you might make the pass mark 160 but make it 190 for someone with a job in Auckland. If your priority is high income earners give them a lower points threshold or give points based on salary bands.

3.      We could adopt the Australian model whereby you keep the pass mark at, say, 160 points for everybody but it is a first in, first out situation. Given there is a finite number of resident visas that can be approved and issued in any given year, what the Australians do is they say if you are a Civil Engineer and you filed your EOI in July last year and you have the same "points" as a Civil Engineer who filed in January this year, you will be selected first.  I am not suggesting we go to annual quotas by occupation - it could simply be a pass mark of 160 and first in first out. It’s clean but again it means you might miss out on particular skills sets because the applicant has to wait for so long to get that shot at residence and they want certainty so take their skills off to Canada instead. 

There is always positives and negatives in any system.

The market always reads the sort of signal sent this morning as negative. I don't feel that way at all.

Clearly the skilled migrant system needs tweaking (and a points based system is a very blunt tool to begin with but given the intellectual capacity of your average civil servant the system is almost designed for them to not have to think terribly hard) but the backlogs in recent times was largely caused by the New Zealand First political party that wanted, and therefore could cause, significant disruption to the migration program.

Now that they are gone, that handbrake has been released.

The Labour Party has also said in their manifesto that one of their priorities is to review the settings of the Parent Category. This will be welcome news to many when the child(ren) they have living in New Zealand who currently don't earn enough to sponsor their parent(s). The only way the Labour Party could get any parent category policy past the New Zealand First coalition partner in the last Government was to limit the numbers annually to 1000 visas and also to impose household income levels that would put the sponsors in the top 20 to 30% of earners in the country or they couldn’t sponsor their parent(s). That excluded many people that would traditionally vote for the Labour Party and given many who traditionally vote Labour are immigrants themselves, I think you can expect to see some movement over the next few months in terms of parent category settings. An easing, not a tightening.

The next three years are going to be very interesting with the government able to govern without worrying about what any coalition partner might think. Given the Labour Party has moved to the right and are very much a centrist party, conservative with a small ‘c’ (but continuing to tell us they are progressives) these days they will want to keep as many of those who would traditionally be centre-right voters.

My prediction is they will return to their pro-immigration roots.

That doesn't mean an open door but equally nor should the confirmation that the pool draws will not resume for another six months be seen as New Zealand shutting the door. Think of it as a bit of house work.

Until next week

Iain MacLeod

Southern Man

Share this post

Tags:
government | eoi | Eligibility

1 comments on this post
Oct. 20, 2020, 8:36 a.m. by Sean

Iain, thanks for the post. I've been giving this matter a lot of thought, as someone waiting for EOI selections to resume. Am I angry? Yes. But not just at the delay itself. What bothers me more is the feeling that the government/INZ are yet again taking heavy-handed, short-sighted action without properly considering the unintended consequences. And we hopeful migrants will most likely be the ones to pay the price of those actions (both emotional and financial, as we worry about our futures and have to pay for more visas in the meantime).
I'm not sure how much I buy the "NZF was the problem" narrative. Prior to the 2017 election, it was the Labour Party that pledged to cut residency numbers. It was a Labour-led government with a Labour Immigration Minister that enacted the NZRP to effect that reduction. It was INZ under the Labour Immigration Minister that chose to carry out that reduction by reducing the number of COs without reducing the number of ITAs (which lead directly to the backlog). It was a Labour-led government that stopped selections in April under the smokescreen of Covid (without ever once explaining how this had anything to do with the onshore EOIs), putting the next batch of would-be residents in the lurch while they attempted to clean up the mess they themselves created. And it is a pure-Labour interim government behind this new delay, which “allows INZ to focus on processing applications from people who are in New Zealand or those eligible to travel here” with zero acknowledgement of those onshore waiting in the EOI pool. WTR applications alone will continue to keep the queue at its current lengths without a drastic increase in the NZRP, which given the current geopolitical climate seems unlikely. So… no more SMC selections ever?
I’m angry that there seems to be no admission on their part of the harm they are causing due to their own past and current mismanagement and what feels like a complete lack of foresight. Including this most recent declaration.

Replies to this comment

Oct. 20, 2020, 8:55 a.m. by Iain
I'm clearly no apologist for the Government or Labour Party but it was in fact he National Party that enacted the first round of cuts to SMC numbers before the Labour led government was voted in in 2017. It was the Nats that continued to issue invitations in numbers that exceeded their own quotas/targets. When Labour/NZ First/Greens got in they cut further but did not reduce the flow of applications into the system either, thus compounding the problem. So in my mind they are all culpable. Don't underestimate the role NZ First played in all of this over the past three years. Their leader boasted about it in public. Of course the Labour Party could have 'grown a pair' and made fixing the problem a make or break issue with NZ First but they were never going to prioritise you over staying in power... I do think though with NZ First gone there is light at the end of this tunnel for all the reasons I have written about recently.
Reply to this comment

Make a comment on this post










 

It's just a thought...

Attend a

FREE SEMINAR

Attend a seminar as a starting point to learn more about the lifestyle of each country, their general migration process and a broad overview of Visa categories.

Register here

Do I stand a chance?

Complete a

FREE PRELIMINARY EVALUATION

Have a preliminary evaluation to establish which Visa category may suit you and whether it’s worth your while ordering a comprehensive Full Assessment.

Free Preliminary Evaluation

I'm ready to talk strategy

Complete a

FULL ASSESSMENT

Let us develop your detailed strategy, timeline and pricing structure in-person or on Skype. Naturally, a small cost applies for this full and comprehensive assessment.

Full Assessment

No SMC pool draw for six months
STAY CONNECTED

Join over 35,000 people who subscribe to our weekly newsletters for up to date migration, lifestyle and light-hearted updates

CONTACT US
Auckland, New Zealand

Level 2, 55-57 High Street, Auckland, New Zealand

+64 9 359 9319 | Contact Form

Melbourne, Australia

Level 2, 517 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, Australia

+61 3 9628 2555 | Contact Form

LICENSING
New Zealand

All of our advisers are individually licensed by the Immigration Advisers Authority (IAA)

Click here for details

Australia

All of our advisers are individually licensed by the Migration Agents Registration Authority (MARA)

Click here for details